TORN CURTAIN
1966, Universal, 128 min, USA, Dir: Alfred Hitchcock

With spy films all the rage in the mid-1960s, director Alfred Hitchcock delves into cloak-and-dagger territory in this underrated Cold War thriller. Physicist Paul Newman defects to East Germany with fiancée Julie Andrews - but he is actually a double agent on the hunt for missile technology. Fast-moving and beautifully shot, TORN CURTAIN includes indelible supporting performances from Lila Kedrova, Tamara Toumanova and Wolfgang Kieling (as a particularly hard-to-kill security officer), and a tense museum sequence that inspired a similar scene in Wes Anderson’s THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL.


MARY POPPINS
1964, Walt Disney Co., 140 min, USA, Dir: Robert Stevenson

When nanny Mary Poppins (Julie Andrews) comes to work for the Banks family in their turn-of-the-20th-century London household, she uplifts everyone’s spirits and brings magic to their lives. Dick Van Dyke is Bert, the good-natured chimney sweep, while the great Jane Darwell, in her last screen appearance, plays the bird lady. Features the classic musical numbers "Chim Chim Cher-ee," "A Spoonful of Sugar," "Feed the Birds" and "Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious."


S.O.B.
1981, Warner Bros., 122 min, Dir: Blake Edwards

When director Richard Mulligan's expensive musical turns out to be a flop, he decides to recut it as an erotic epic that will exploit the squeaky-clean image of star Julie Andrews. This hilarious and trenchant satire has echoes of Edwards' own experiences making DARLING LILI, but its comedy reaches beyond mere score-settling to present a mercilessly funny - and at times surprisingly sweet - poison-pen love letter to the American cinema. The great supporting cast includes William Holden, Robert Webber, Robert Vaughn, Larry Hagman (J.R. of "Dallas") and a very young Rosanna Arquette.


Syndicate content