THE MAN FROM THE ALAMO
1953, Universal, 79 min, USA, Dir: Budd Boetticher

“Out of Texas’ bravest hour…came the man they called the coward.” As the titular character of this Technicolor Western, John Stroud (Glenn Ford) is chosen to leave the famed fort during its siege and warn the locals of Mexican General Santa Ana’s approach. But after the battle, when there are no survivors to vouch for him, Stroud is accused of desertion and must work to clear his name and bring those who’d exploited the massacre at the Alamo to justice. Costarring Julie Adams, Chill Wills, Hugh O’Brien and Jeanne Cooper.


BEND OF THE RIVER
1952, Universal, 91 min, USA, Dir: Anthony Mann

James Stewart stars as a former border raider who narrowly escapes the hangman's noose (he still smarts from the rope) and is trying to start over again in the wide-open Oregon country. Instead, he winds up involved with the wily and charming Arthur Kennedy in a wagon train that includes the eligible Laurie Baile (Julie Adams) and a load of supplies worth their weight in gold. One of director Anthony Mann's finest films, combining action, character and landscape in a seamless and wildly satisfying package.


CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON
1954, Universal, 79 min, USA, Dir: Jack Arnold

Ichthyologist Dr. David Reed (Richard Carlson) leads a team of scientists on an expedition up the Amazon River to hunt for fossils linking prehistoric land and sea mammals. But the murky waters of the region’s Black Lagoon hide more than old bones; an amphibious gill-man rises from the depths to attack the researchers. Like King Kong, the creature is captured, escapes and sets his sights on a beautiful woman - Dr. Reed’s girlfriend, Kay (Julia Adams). The last of the classic Universal movie monsters, CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON was one of the studio’s first 3-D features, and remains among the most memorable horror films of the 1950s.


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