RYAN’S DAUGHTER
1970, Warner Bros., 187 min, UK, Dir: David Lean

Initially planned as a return to the small-scale storytelling of David Lean’s BRIEF ENCOUNTER days, RYAN’S DAUGHTER instead became an epic contest between the director and the Irish landscape, as he attempted to tell the tragic story of a married Irish woman (played by Sarah Miles, wife of the film’s screenwriter, Robert Bolt) and her affair with a shell-shocked British soldier (Christopher Jones). A flawed gem, the film boasts some great performances (John Mills, who won a Best Supporting Actor Oscar, and Leo McKern) and some still-underrated ones (Robert Mitchum, as a meek schoolteacher). Freddie Young’s astonishing cinematography ranks with his best work on LAWRENCE OF ARABIA and DOCTOR ZHIVAGO.


THE HUMAN FACTOR
1975, 95 min, Dir: Edward Dmytryk

After NATO computer expert John Kinsdale (George Kennedy) comes home from work to discover that his family has been killed, he puts his skills to use hunting down the terrorists responsible. John Mills, Rita Tushingham and Raf Vallone costar in veteran director Edward Dmytryk's final film.


TUNES OF GLORY
1960, Janus Films, 106 min, UK, Dir: Ronald Neame

Two Scottish army colonels battle over their very different methods and backgrounds when lower-class Jock Sinclair (Alec Guinness, in one of his favorite performances) is forced to work with upper-crust disciplinarian and bureaucrat Basil Barrow (John Mills). Before long, their philosophical differences threaten the unity of their entire regiment, as a series of minor events sets off a chain reaction in this riveting drama from director Ronald Neame.


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