ALWAYS
1989, Universal, 122 min, USA, Dir: Steven Spielberg

Based on the WWII drama A GUY NAMED JOE, this moving fantasy-romance is among director Steven Spielberg’s most underrated films. Warned by girlfriend Holly Hunter and colleague John Goodman that he takes too many risks, aerial firefighter Richard Dreyfuss resolves to take a safer job - but one last mission turns him from a pilot into a guardian angel. Audrey Hepburn costars in her final big-screen appearance.


TRUMBO
2015, Bleecker Street Media, 124 min, USA, Dir: Jay Roach

Screenwriter Dalton Trumbo earned Oscars for ROMAN HOLIDAY and THE BRAVE ONE, but his name didn’t appear in the films’ credits – he’d been blacklisted in 1947. Bryan Cranston (of TV’s “Breaking Bad”) stars in this sharp-eyed and entertaining look at one of Hollywood history’s darker chapters, leading a great cast that also includes Diane Lane, Elle Fanning, Helen Mirren, John Goodman and Louis C.K.


INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS
2013, CBS Films, 105 min, USA, Dir: Ethan Coen, Joel Coen

Just before the early-1960s folk boom turned them into magnets for aspiring singers, the clubs and coffeehouses of Greenwich Village were peopled by the likes of Llewyn Davis (Oscar Isaac), a struggling troubadour whose traditional repertoire puts him on the margins of the music business along with a handful of other earnest and occasionally eccentric characters. The Coen brothers’ INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS brings the birth of folk into focus as effectively as their O BROTHER, WHERE ART THOU? did bluegrass. That earlier film’s musical midwife, T Bone Burnett, handles similar duties here as an Executive Music Producer, and stars Oscar Isaac, Carey Mulligan and Justin Timberlake all do their own singing on screen. The film was the Grand Prix award winner at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival.


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