OUR BLUSHING BRIDES
1930, Warner Bros., 102 min, USA, Dir: Harry Beaumont

The conclusion of the trilogy that began with OUR DANCING DAUGHTERS and OUR MODERN MAIDENS, this drama stars Joan Crawford, Anita Page and Dorothy Sebastian as three young women trying to make a good life in Manhattan. Geraldine (Crawford) weds the wealthy Tony (Robert Montgomery) after he realizes that is the only way he will get her into his bed. Francine (Sebastian) marries thief Martin J. Sanderson (John Miljan) in the mistaken belief that her groom is a millionaire. And Connie (Page) weakens to temptation and becomes the mistress of Tony's younger brother (Raymond Hackett). Will they become blushing brides or girls without blushes?


GRAND HOTEL
1932, Warner Bros., 113 min, USA, Dir: Edmund Goulding

Director Edmund Goulding orchestrates a dazzling parade of iconographic stars and intersecting subplots. Ballerina Greta Garbo, aristocrat John Barrymore, secretary Joan Crawford and cutthroat mogul Wallace Beery are just a few of the legends who make their way through this classic ensemble drama, a film whose influence can be seen in later films by Robert Altman and P.T. Anderson, among many others. Cedric Gibbons’ stunning Art Deco art direction gives the players an opulent setting for their personal melodramas.


THE WOMEN
1939, Warner Bros., 133 min, USA, Dir: George Cukor

George Cukor (A STAR IS BORN, MY FAIR LADY) directs Norma Shearer, Joan Crawford, Paulette Goddard and Joan Fontaine in a cast of 135 woman (with nothing on their minds, but men) wearing costumes designed by Adrian! Catch your breath yet? There is a six minute Technicolor fashion sequence too! Forget the plot which is essentially ‘who’s stepping out on who’ and focus on the fact that this movie takes things out of the boudoir and onto the screen in a picture that lets you see these women “with their hair down and their claws out,” and we quote. “I’ve had two years to grow my claws Mother… JUNGLE RED!” The Great Gatsby author F. Scott Fitzgerald worked on the script at some point, but is uncredited. Three female writers, Clare Boothe Luce, Anita Loos & Jane Muffin got the screenplay done!


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