THE RECKLESS MOMENT
1949, 82 min, USA, Dir: Max Ophuls

Suburban housewife Joan Bennett goes to extraordinary lengths to cover up a murder committed by her daughter. Then blackmailer James Mason enters the picture: sadist or saint? Top-of-the-line suspense from the great Max Ophuls. Remade as THE DEEP END - see the original and decide for yourself if you'd rather have Joan Bennett or Tilda Swinton for a mother.


HOLLOW TRIUMPH
1948, Eagle-Lion, 83 min, Dir: Steve Sekely

Fugitive crook Johnny Muller (Paul Henreid) finds the perfect hiding place - in the guise of a psychiatrist who is his identical twin … almost. One of the sublime examples of noir fatalism, with a clever script that will keep you guessing - and the added attraction of an amazingly evocative look at 1940s Los Angeles, photographed by the great John Alton. This was the first film produced by romantic leading man Henreid, who like many actors in the late 1940s turned to crime dramas to revitalize their careers. Costarring Joan Bennett at her snarly best.


SCARLET STREET
1945, Kino Lorber, 103 min, USA, Dir: Fritz Lang

Fritz Lang’s classic film noir reunited his WOMAN IN THE WINDOW stars Edward G. Robinson, Joan Bennett and Dan Duryea in a reworking of Jean Renoir’s 1931 LA CHIENNE. Robinson’s middle-aged bookkeeper and amateur artist becomes hopelessly ensnared by the seductive Bennett and her lover-pimp, Duryea. The result is a psychological thriller, with Robinson’s increasing desperation contrasting with his predators’ unremitting ruthlessness. As with WOMAN IN THE WINDOW, Lang reveals the potential criminal in the average citizen.


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