INTERSTELLAR
2014, Paramount Pictures and Warner Bros. Pictures, 169 min, USA, Dir: Christopher Nolan

In the not-too-distant future, life on Earth can no longer sustain itself. It’s up to Cooper, a pilot-turned reluctant farmer-turned astronaut, to lead a team into space to look for new worlds to inhabit. Combining family drama with eye-popping visuals and mind-expanding philosophical inquiry, Nolan’s sci-fi epic stars Matthew McConaughey, Anne Hathaway, Jessica Chastain, Ellen Burstyn, John Lithgow and Michael Caine and won an Oscars for its stunning visual effects. “An enormous undertaking that, like all the director’s best work, manages to feel handcrafted and intensely personal, “Interstellar” reaffirms Nolan as the premier big-canvas storyteller of his generation, more than earning its place alongside THE WIZARD OF OZ, 2001, CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF THE THIRD KIND and GRAVITY in the canon of Hollywood’s visionary sci-fi head trips.” - Scott Foundas, Variety.


WILDE SALOMÉ
2011, Salome Productions, 90 min, USA, Dir: Al Pacino

This filmic collage captures the highs and lows of presenting a challenging work by one of the greatest writers of the 20th century, Oscar Wilde. Staging the play live in Los Angeles, director Al Pacino tackles its problems and issues and helps discover a new star, Jessica Chastain, in the title role of SALOMÉ. Pacino also grapples with Wilde’s need to express something utterly different from anything he had written before, and with finding a way to make a movie of the entire event. An unusual, revealing and avant-garde journey into the light and heart of Oscar Wilde's masterwork.


SALOMÉ
2013, Salome Productions, 77 min, USA, Dir: Al Pacino

The story of a princess who lived in the time of Jesus. Salomé is in love with prophet John the Baptist, whom her stepfather, King Herod, has imprisoned in a well for heresy. But her love is spurned, and after the king drunkenly promises the princess anything she wants in exchange for an erotically charged dance, Salomé puts Herod in a terrible position by demanding the head of John the Baptist - the only man the king fears. "SALOMÉ is my attempt to merge play and film. The mediums can collide and my hope is to have them unify so that you're seeing pure theater on film. To make that hybrid effective has been my goal; to have the more naturalistic photogenic qualities of film complement the language-driven essence of theater." - Al Pacino


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