AFTER THE THIN MAN
1936, Warner Bros., 112 min, USA, Dir: W.S. Van Dyke

Nick and Nora (William Powell and Myrna Loy) return to San Francisco, where familial obligations thrust them headlong into an investigation of love and ambition gone murderously wrong. With characteristic smarts and sass, the two chase mystery and murders from drawing room to nightclub to boarding house. James Stewart joins the cast in a pivotal role.


HARVEY
1950, Universal, 104 min, USA, Dir: Henry Koster

Easily the greatest movie ever made starring a 6-foot-3-inch invisible rabbit. Jimmy Stewart gives his own favorite performance as Elwood P. Dowd, a perfectly nice guy whose best pal nobody can see, leading his sister (Oscar winner Josephine Hull) to try to get him committed. Featuring Cecil Kellaway, Wallace Ford and, in his film debut, Jesse White. Based on Mary Chase’s play (in which Stewart previously starred), written to cheer up a neighbor whose son was killed in WWII. A warm, wonderful and truly ageless comedy!


THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH (1956)
1956, Universal, 120 min, USA, Dir: Alfred Hitchcock

Alfred Hitchcock remakes his own entertaining but lightweight 1934 thriller as a melancholy examination of the pleasures and nightmares of family life. When the son of James Stewart and Doris Day is kidnapped while on vacation, the couple’s long-simmering resentments threaten to get in the way of their attempts to rescue him. Although the film is rightly celebrated for setpieces like the famous Albert Hall assassination sequence, the depth of Hitchcock’s vision is more effectively felt in the film’s quieter moments: The scene in which Stewart tells Day their son has been kidnapped is one of the most powerful in all of Hitchcock’s cinema.


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