HARD TIMES
1975, Sony Repertory, 93 min, USA, Dir: Walter Hill

Walter Hill’s debut feature as director is this no-holds-barred tale of a bare-knuckle boxer (Charles Bronson) in Depression-era New Orleans and the fast-talking promoter (James Coburn) who parlays Bronson’s talents as a pugilist into quick money. “There's the temptation, with material like this, to fashion parables and give the characters portentous speeches about the meaning of it all. But HARD TIMES never steps back from itself, never lectures us. Its theme is buried in its material, and it's a hard-edged action film all the way.” – Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times.


OUR MAN FLINT
1966, 20th Century Fox, 107 min, Dir: Daniel Mann

Lean, mean loving machine Derek Flint (James Coburn) takes on the evil boys at GALAXY in a struggle for world domination and a good recipe for bouillabaisse. Essential Swinging ’60s equipment here: a cigarette lighter with 83 different functions. With Lee J. Cobb and Gila Golan, and a terrific, super-spy score by composer Jerry Goldsmith.


RIDE LONESOME
1959, Sony Repertory, 73 min, USA, Dir: Budd Boetticher

Shot in CinemaScope, this complex, poetic revenge tragedy stars Randolph Scott as a sheriff turned bounty hunter, using a young desperado to flush out his murderous older brother. Scott’s final act of absolution at the hanging tree ranks with John Wayne’s last moments in THE SEARCHERS. With Pernell Roberts and James Coburn.


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