OPERA
aka TERROR AT THE OPERA
1987, 100 min, Italy, Dir: Dario Argento

One of director Dario Argento’s greatest masterpieces, OPERA is a tour-de-force of deliriously cinematic setpieces surrounding the murderous production of an operatic version of "Macbeth." (The script was inspired by Argento’s attempt to mount "Rigoletto"!) Argento’s camera moves like a thing possessed: swooping, gliding, tracking a bullet through a peephole and, in one mind-bending shot, whirling around the opera house on raven’s wings. When a prominent opera star suffers a non-fatal car accident, her understudy Betty (Cristina Marsillach) must take on the role of Lady Macbeth. Coincidentally, a deranged madman goes on a homicidal rampage. Co-starring Ian Charleson and Daria Nicolodi (DEEP RED). “A violent aria of memory, bad luck, the artistic drive and the horror of the stare. … If you've pinpointed the identity of the film's killer, it's of little consequence - the genius of the film lies not in such details but in Argento's operatic attention to death and the way in which the film's killer forces Betty's gaze.” – Ed Gonzalez, SlantMagazine.com.


CHARIOTS OF FIRE
1981, Warner Bros., 124 min, UK, Dir: Hugh Hudson

Based on actual events, this inspiring drama follows a pair of British runners in the 1924 Olympics: Harold Abrahams (Ben Cross) and Eric Liddell (Ian Charleson). Abrahams is a Jew who competes to battle anti-Semitism, while Liddell is a Christian who runs to glorify God - and confronts hurdles when he refuses to race on a Sunday. Named one of the top British films of all time by the British Film Institute, CHARIOTS OF FIRE won four Oscars, including Best Picture and Original Score (for Vangelis’ distinctive electronic music, forever linked to shots of young men in white running in slow motion along a beach).


Syndicate content