CRASH
1996, Fine Line, 100 min, Canada/UK, Dir: David Cronenberg

Controversy positively mushroomed in the wake of director David Cronenberg’s savagely candid NC-17 adaptation of J.G. Ballard’s infamous 1973 novel. After suffering a catastrophic accident, James Ballard (James Spader) suddenly finds himself sexually aroused by car crashes, something that introduces him to a group of like-minded accident victims that includes Holly Hunter and Rosanna Arquette. But Vaughan (Elias Koteas), their defacto leader and the most-addicted to the phenomenon of flesh merging with metal, pushes the envelope way beyond near death experiences. With Deborah Kara Unger.


ALWAYS
1989, Universal, 122 min, USA, Dir: Steven Spielberg

Based on the WWII drama A GUY NAMED JOE, this moving fantasy-romance is among director Steven Spielberg’s most underrated films. Warned by girlfriend Holly Hunter and colleague John Goodman that he takes too many risks, aerial firefighter Richard Dreyfuss resolves to take a safer job - but one last mission turns him from a pilot into a guardian angel. Audrey Hepburn costars in her final big-screen appearance.


THIRTEEN
2003, Fox Searchlight, 100 min, Dir: Catherine Hardwicke

Straight-A student Tracy (Evan Rachel Wood) lives peacefully with her divorced mother Melanie (Oscar-nominated Holly Hunter), until she befriends the cool Evie (Nikki Reed, also co-writer), the most popular and beautiful girl in school. The 13-year-old girl's relationship with her mother is put to the test as Tracy discovers drugs, sex, self-mutilation and petty crime. “A raw psychodrama about a girl who leapfrogs from pre-adolescent innocence to reckless rebel ... THIRTEEN is a deliberately unvarnished shock piece ... Catherine Hardwicke’s helming debut, which won the jury's directing prize at Sundance, can fairly be compared to the work of Larry Clark, such as KIDS.” – Variety.


Syndicate content