A ROOM WITH A VIEW
1985, Park Circus, 117 min, UK, Dir: James Ivory

Adapted from E.M. Forster’s best-known novel, A ROOM WITH A VIEW tracks English heroine Lucy Honeychurch (Helena Bonham Carter) during and after a fateful trip to 1907 Florence. Trapped by the confines of Edwardian society, Lucy kindles a flame for the ardent, free-thinking George Emerson (Julian Sands). In order to accept married life back in the English countryside, however, she must quell her desire and leave George behind - until they meet again. Nominated for eight Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Director and Adapted Screenplay, A ROOM WITH A VIEW is just as much an ode to inescapable feelings as to the red-tiled Renaissance roofs of Florence.


THE YOUNG AND PRODIGIOUS T.S. SPIVET
2013, The Weinstein Company, 105 min, France/Canada, Dir: Jean-Pierre Jeunet

This beguiling big-screen adaptation of Reif Larsen’s popular novel follows Tecumseh Sparrow Spivet (Kyle Catlett), a 10-year-old inventor who travels on his own from his family’s Montana home to Washington, D.C. to accept a prize from the Smithsonian Institution. Helena Bonham Carter and Judy Davis costar in the film, which earned a César Award winner for best cinematography. “THE YOUNG AND PRODIGIOUS T.S. SPIVET is the perfect 3-D vehicle and Jeunet takes full advantage, offering a feast of amusing visual flourishes suited to the book's playfulness.” - Jay Weissberg, Variety.


FIGHT CLUB
1999, 20th Century Fox, 139 min, USA, Germany, Dir: David Fincher

Director David Fincher adapts Chuck Palahniuk’s mind-twisting novel. Edward Norton is the nameless narrator, an insomniac looking for relief who briefly finds comfort in various support groups. But when he encounters another lost soul (Helena Bonham Carter) with increasing regularity, the comfort disappears. Then Tyler Durden (Brad Pitt) enters the scene, an untamed force of nature. The two soon find an intoxicating bond in pummeling each other senseless and, before long, they have other guys who want to join in. “FIGHT CLUB delivers a sucker punch to the audience and then pulls the rug out from under it. It is sensational. It is also grimly funny.” - Bob Graham, San Francisco Chronicle.


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