WHO’S THAT KNOCKING AT MY DOOR
1967, Warner Bros., 90 min, USA, Dir: Martin Scorsese

Martin Scorsese took the filmmaking world by storm at the 1967 Chicago International Film Festival with this New York City-set drama that is steeped in cinema history while forging ahead towards something new. Shrouded in the fog of Catholic guilt which so informs his later films, WHO’S THAT KNOCKING AT MY DOOR is a haunting story of a young couples’ reckoning with a traumatizing event. Featuring the acting debut of Harvey Keitel, along with a memorable performance by Zina Bethune, the film, as critic Roger Ebert observed upon its premiere, was “absolutely genuine” and “a great moment in American movies.”


BAD TIMING
1980, Park Circus/ITV, 123 min, Dir: Nicolas Roeg

An all-star cast heads this drama about love, possession and obsession. Alex (Art Garfunkel) is an American psychoanalyst and lecturer in Vienna. He meets and falls in love with Milena (Theresa Russell), a young and beautiful American, and the two embark on a passionate affair. She, however, does not wish to be confined to one man, and as she becomes increasingly unfaithful, Alex becomes more and more possessive. The film is told in flashback as Alex sits in a hospital where Milena is being treated for a drug overdose. He recounts the events to the investigating officer (Harvey Keitel), who must decide whether her condition is attempted suicide or something more sinister.


THELMA & LOUISE
1991, Park Circus/MGM, 128 min, USA/France, Dir: Ridley Scott

Thelma (Geena Davis) and Louise (Susan Sarandon) take a fishing trip to get away from their dead-end relationships, only to end up dispatching a would-be rapist. This results in a cross-country rampage on the lam from the law, all culminating in one of the most daring, simultaneously uplifting/downbeat climaxes ever recorded on film, due in no small part to Ridley Scott’s expert direction and Callie Khouri’s gutsy script. With Harvey Keitel and a young Brad Pitt in his breakout role.


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