BLADE RUNNER 2049
2017, Warner Bros., 164 min, Dir: Denis Villeneuve

Thirty years after the events of the first film, a new blade runner, LAPD Officer K (Ryan Gosling), unearths a long-buried secret that has the potential to plunge what’s left of society into chaos. K’s discovery leads him on a quest to find Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford), a former LAPD blade runner who has been missing for decades. Nominated for five Oscars including Best Cinematography, Best Visual Effects, Best Sound Editing, Best Sound Mixing and Best Production Design. Kenneth Turan of the Los Angeles Times said, “What’s remarkable about BLADE RUNNER 2049 is how good it is. The bottom line is indisputable: As shaped by Villeneuve and his masterful creative team, this film puts you firmly, brilliantly, unassailably in another world of its own devising, and that is no small thing.”


BLADE RUNNER
1982, Warner Bros., 117 min, USA, Hong Kong, UK, Dir: Ridley Scott

Director Ridley Scott’s acknowledged masterpiece, BLADE RUNNER is also one of the most influential films of the past 30 years, a dazzling fusion of retro-noir and future paranoia, set in a decaying, rain-drenched Los Angeles dominated by Mayan pyramids of unimaginable wealth. Harrison Ford stars as the government-sanctioned killer who falls in love with gorgeous, enigmatic Sean Young, while trying to eliminate Rutger Hauer and his rogue band of genetically engineered replicants.


WORKING GIRL
1988, 20th Century Fox, 113 min, USA, Dir: Mike Nichols

This immensely likable look at one woman’s attempt to break through the glass ceiling features a near-unimprovable cast topped by Melanie Griffith as a secretary with big ideas, Sigourney Weaver as the boss who steals them and Harrison Ford as the man both have eyes for. A Cinderella story for the 1980s (complete with the decade’s focus on big business and even bigger hair), Nichols’ sure-handed romantic comedy picked up six Oscar nominations, including a win for Carly Simon’s original song “Let the River Run.”


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