SAFETY LAST!
1923, Janus Films, 73 min, USA, Dir: Fred C. Newmeyer, Sam Taylor

The comic genius of silent star Harold Lloyd is eternal. Chaplin is the sweet innocent, Keaton the stoic outsider, but Lloyd - the modern guy striving for success - is us. And with its torrent of perfectly executed gags and astonishing stunts, SAFETY LAST! is the perfect introduction to him. Lloyd plays a small-town bumpkin trying to make it in the big city, who finds employment as a lowly department-store clerk. He comes up with a wild publicity stunt to draw attention to the store, resulting in an incredible feat of derring-do on his part that gets him started on the climb to success – a climb that results in one of the most iconic images in film history, as Lloyd dangles from a clock high above the streets of Los Angeles.


SPEEDY
1928, Janus Films, 86 min, United States , Dir: Ted Wilde

Harold Lloyd makes his last silent appearance in this classic about a baseball-obsessed soda jerk who becomes a cab driver. Soon he's desperately trying to rescue the last horse-drawn streetcar line in town - which belongs to the father of his girl (Ann Christy) - from greedy railway magnates. Chaos ensues, including some of the most spectacular real-life chases ever filmed. Look for the legendary Babe Ruth as a nervous passenger in Lloyd’s cab.


"Never Weaken"
1921, 19 min, USA, Dir: Harold Lloyd

Lloyd's final short film, and the third of five "thrill" pictures featuring his stunt climbing work (here he stumbles upon the girders of a high-rise building), follows a typically lovelorn Harold, who decides to commit suicide - and spends the majority of the film failing hilariously - when he hears his crush is to marry another. Scenes were filmed immediately adjacent to where the Egyptian Theatre was built in 1922, and where the Pig 'n Whistle was later built in 1927.


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