CREEPSHOW
1982, Warner Bros., 120 min, USA, Dir: George Romero

There hadn’t been a lot of anthology movies when the George Romero/Stephen King collaboration CREEPSHOW, a film inspired by classic EC horror comics, debuted in 1982; in comparison to the sober, big-budget thrills of POLTERGEIST and THE THING, the Romero/King effort was a refreshing blast of B-movie fun, low on budget and ambition but with a surprisingly good cast: Hal Holbrook, E.G. Marshall, Ted Danson, Leslie Nielsen, Ed Harris, Fritz Weaver and Stephen King himself. "The Lonesome Death of Jordy Verrill," the segment with King (as an incredibly stupid farmer), is probably the most memorable even though it’s a short vignette compared with the others - it’s a deft takeoff of THE BLOB and a riff on those moronic victims in ’50s sci-fi movies who always want to be first in line to check out that strange light coming from over the next rise.


MAGNUM FORCE
1973, Warner Bros., 124 min, Dir: Ted Post

In what may be the best of the high-caliber franchise, Clint Eastwood returns as “Dirty” Harry Callahan, a San Francisco cop who carries an imposing .44 magnum. This time he’s on the trail of traffic cops (including David Soul, Tim Matheson and Robert Urich) turned vigilantes. John Milius and Michael Cimino penned the taut script.


ALL THE PRESIDENT’S MEN
1976, Warner Bros., 138 min, USA, Dir: Alan J. Pakula

Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman shine as Washington Post investigative reporters Woodward and Bernstein, the pair responsible for uncovering the shocking truth behind the Watergate break-in. A tense, real-life detective saga demonstrating what a courageous free press can accomplish, with a sterling supporting cast that includes Jason Robards, Martin Balsam, Jack Warden, Jane Alexander, Hal Holbrook and F. Murray Abraham.


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