GRAND HOTEL
1932, Warner Bros., 113 min, USA, Dir: Edmund Goulding

Director Edmund Goulding orchestrates a dazzling parade of iconographic stars and intersecting subplots. Ballerina Greta Garbo, aristocrat John Barrymore, secretary Joan Crawford and cutthroat mogul Wallace Beery are just a few of the legends who make their way through this classic ensemble drama, a film whose influence can be seen in later films by Robert Altman and P.T. Anderson, among many others. Cedric Gibbons’ stunning Art Deco art direction gives the players an opulent setting for their personal melodramas.


NINOTCHKA
1939, Warner Bros., 110 min, USA, Dir: Ernst Lubitsch

"Garbo Laughs!" screamed the ads, and so will you, as a stuffy Russian commissar (Greta Garbo) assigned to Paris matches wits with bon vivant Melvyn Douglas. She never had a chance. The second and last time Billy Wilder worked with his idol; his script (with Charles Brackett and Walter Reisch) is inspired, and the Lubitsch Touch is in full force. With Ina Claire, Sig Ruman, Felix Bressart and - no kidding - Bela Lugosi!


CAMILLE
1936, Warner Bros., 109 min, Dir: George Cukor

Lovely Parisian courtesan Marguerite (the smoldering, sensuous Greta Garbo) must choose between the prickly Baron de Varville, who's elevated her from a life of poverty to luxury, and handsome Armand (Robert Taylor), even as her health begins to deteriorate due to tuberculosis. Garbo received an Oscar nomination for Best Actress for her devastating performance.


Syndicate content