ROMAN HOLIDAY
1953, Paramount, 118 min, Dir: William Wyler

A real-life princess (Audrey Hepburn), weary of her sheltered existence, takes off on her own to see the sights of Rome, only to encounter romance in the form of suave Gregory Peck. But unbeknownst to Hepburn, Peck is really a reporter out for a story, a fact that inevitably complicates things as the two grow more intimate. This sweet-natured romantic comedy won three Oscars, including Best Actress for Hepburn.


THE STALKING MOON
1968, Warner Brothers, 109 min, Dir: Robert Mulligan

Gregory Peck reunites with his TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD director Robert Mulligan for this highly underrated Western thriller. U.S. Army soldiers encounter a group of Indians that includes a white woman and her half-Indian son; the woman (Eva Marie Saint) is desperate for cavalry scout Sam Varner (Gregory Peck) to take her and the child to Varner’s New Mexico ranch. The reason for her concern is soon clear – the boy’s father is a fearsome warrior who will stop at nothing to take him back.


TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD
1962, Universal, 129 min, USA, Dir: Robert Mulligan

Hollywood pro Robert Mulligan pulls off the rarest of achievements with this adaptation of Harper Lee’s classic novel: He brings a great book to the screen and improves upon it. Gregory Peck is superb as a small-town lawyer who defends a black man accused of rape. But what distinguishes the film is director Mulligan's deft use of subjective camerawork to approximate the point of view of the children who struggle to understand the case. Peck, screenwriter Horton Foote and a team of art directors that included the legendary Henry Bumstead deservedly won Oscars for their work on this timeless classic. Robert Duvall makes his feature debut as Boo Radley.


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