THE SERPENT’S EGG
1977, Park Circus/MGM, 118 min, USA/West Germany, Dir: Ingmar Bergman

A large U.S./West German co-production shot entirely in English with a fascinating mystery at the center of its plot, THE SERPENT’S EGG is an underappreciated anomaly in Bergman’s filmography. Starring David Carradine alongside Bergman regular Liv Ullmann, the film takes place in 1920s Berlin, as Nazi sentiment was beginning to brew just below the surface of German society. While it was originally panned by critics (perhaps due to its significant departure from his other work), the film offers an honest reflection on the director’s early memories of fascism during his time in Germany as a teenager.


THOSE MAGNIFICENT MEN IN THEIR FLYING MACHINES
1965, 20th Century Fox, 132 min, UK, Dir: Ken Annakin

Stuart Whitman, Sarah Miles, Robert Morley, James Fox and the ever-delightful Terry-Thomas star as a group of lovably crack-pot aviators, inventors and villains competing to win a London-to-Paris air race in 1910, in director Ken Annakin’s irresistible combination of epic adventure and slapstick comedy.


CHITTY CHITTY BANG BANG
1968, Park Circus, 142 min, UK, Dir: Ken Hughes

Widowed father and eccentric inventor Caractacus Potts (Dick Van Dyke) transforms a broken-down old car into a flying machine - to the delight of his children (Heather Ripley, Adrian Hall) and the envy of the tantrum-prone Vulgarian kingdom (Gert Frobe, who played Goldfinger in that 007 film), who has outlawed children in his king. The Potts family, with candy factory heiress Truly Scrumptious (Sally Ann Howes), head to the kingdom to save the day!


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