We’re thrilled to announce a complete re-design of the American Cinematheque website. See The New Site Now >
FOREIGN CORRESPONDENT
1940, IPMA, 120 min, USA, Dir: Alfred Hitchcock

With the advent of World War II looming, action reporter Johnny Jones (Joel McCrea) is assigned the job of European correspondent for his New York newspaper and told to track down the secret treaty made by two unnamed European countries and a famous diplomat, Mr. Van Meer. Of course this assignment proves more treacherous than Johnny bargained for, and a deadly, positively Hitchcockian game of cat-and-mouse ensues. Look for the now-famous umbrella sequence, tracking a killer’s getaway, and the eerily cinematic windmill scene. With Laraine Day and George Sanders.


A SHOT IN THE DARK
1964, MGM Repertory, 99 min, Dir: Blake Edwards

Blake Edwards’ follow-up to THE PINK PANTHER is a non-stop barrage of pratfalls, sight gags and linguistic nonsense, courtesy of Inspector Clouseau (Peter Sellers). Everything seems freshly minted, from Herbert Lom’s hysterics as Chief Inspector Dreyfus to Burt Kwouk’s first appearance as Cato.


ALL ABOUT EVE
1950, 20th Century Fox, 138 min, Dir: Joseph L. Mankiewicz

Seemingly timid fan Eve (Anne Baxter) ingratiates herself into Broadway mega-star Bette Davis’ inner circle in this backstage, backstabbing masterpiece by Joseph L. Mankiewicz. Eve wastes no time stealing Davis’ spotlight and man (Gary Merrill), but Davis takes nothing lying down. A superb supporting cast (George Sanders, Marilyn Monroe, Thelma Ritter and Celeste Holm) brings New York's theater set to life. Winner of 6 Oscars, including Best Picture, Director and Screenplay. Edited by Barbara McLean. "Fasten your seatbelts...it’s going to be a bumpy night."


Syndicate content