WHERE THE SIDEWALK ENDS
1950, 20th Century Fox, 95 min, USA, Dir: Otto Preminger

Dana Andrews gives one of his most compelling performances as an angry and haunted New York cop whose violent streak leads to the killing of an informer. His attempts to cover up the crime only dig the hole deeper, as his lies make a suspect of an innocent man - the father of the woman he loves! Ben Hecht’s terrific script, based on the novel Night Cry by Victor Trivas, provides the bedrock for one of Preminger’s best film noirs, shot by the great Joseph LaShelle (LAURA).


LEAVE HER TO HEAVEN
1946, 20th Century Fox, 111 min, USA, Dir: John Stahl

Exhibit A in the argument that film noir isn't always black-and-white. Don't let the stunningly lush Technicolor fool you - this big-budget soap opera has the blackest of hearts and is as perverse and malignant as it got in the ’40s. Novelist Cornel Wilde falls for gorgeous Gene Tierney but has no idea of the darkness lurking behind those emerald eyes. A rare chance to see Leon Shamroy's Oscar-winning cinematography on the big screen.


NIGHT AND THE CITY
1950, 20th Century Fox, 96 min, UK/USA, Dir: Jules Dassin

One of the most baroque and bleak film noirs of them all, its greatness - besides Richard Widmark's devastating portrayal of the maniacal, pathetic con man and small-time promoter Harry Fabian - is its stubborn refusal to allow even the tiniest ray of light into Harry's headlong descent into hell. Featuring an unforgettable supporting rogue's gallery, including Googie Withers, Herbert Lom, Francis L. Sullivan, Mike Mazurki, Stanislaus Zbyszko - and the gorgeous Gene Tierney (LAURA). With a screenplay by Jo Eisinger from the novel by Gerald Kersh.


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