SUCH A PRETTY LITTLE BEACH
UNE SI JOLIE PETITE PLAGE
1949, Pathe, 91 min, France/Netherlands, Dir: Yves Allégret

In endless rain on France’s Breton coast, Gérard Philipe gives his most unforgettable performance as a man on the run in Yves Allegret’s UNE SI JOLIE PETITE PLAGE. It’s surely one of the bleakest - and wettest - noirs of all time, with an unforgettable cast of cynical and compromised characters, with Madeleine Robinson as the only ray of light in Philipe’s desperate attempt to escape his plight.


FEVER RISES AT EL PAO
LA FIEVRE MONTE A EL PAO
1959, Janus Films, 97 min, France/Mexico, Dir: Luis Buñuel

In Luis Buñuel’s incendiary LA FIEVRE MONTE A EL PAO, Gérard Philipe plays an idealistic reformer who becomes embroiled in complex political intrigue when a repressive dictator is assassinated. Among the supporting cast are many of Mexico’s most celebrated and distinguished actors (Roberto Cañedo, Andres Soler, Victor Junco, Domingo Soler), topped by the legendary Maria Felix as the conniving widow of the fallen dictator. Legendary cinematographer Gabriel Figueroa captures both the heat and the stark angles of an island paradise thrust into a seemingly endless inferno.


THE PROUD AND THE BEAUTIFUL
LES ORGUEILLEUX
1953, Pathé, 103 min, France/Mexico, Dir: Yves Allegret

Was director Yves Allegret “answering” Henri-Georges Clouzot with this film, where the setting is highly reminiscent of the oppressive atmosphere permeating THE WAGES OF FEAR? Here, however, there is no harrowing adventure tale at the dark center of the story - only the ravaged lives of two lost souls (Gérard Philipe, a doctor whose dalliance in a sweltering Mexican town has reduced him to a hopeless drunk; Michèle Morgan, a woman whose life hangs in the balance once her disreputable husband dies during the outset of a raging typhoid epidemic). What happens to these two is the crux of this powerful melo-noir that dares to take both of them to the brink of degradation, with only the barest chance of escape. Adapted by Jean Aurenche from a play by Jean-Paul Sartre.


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