DEATH OF A SALESMAN
1951, Sony Repertory, 105 min, Finland , Dir: Laslo Benedek

Stanley Kramer produced this adaptation of Arthur Miller's landmark play, in which aging failure Willy Loman (Fredric March) looks back on his life as it slips away. A stellar supporting cast that includes Kevin McCarthy, Mildred Dunnock and Cameron Mitchell brings Miller's bleak vision to life, aided by director Laslo Benedek's evocative and claustrophobic visual style. Benedek, March and McCarthy each won Golden Globes, as did Franz Planer for the film’s B&W cinematography.


A STAR IS BORN (1937)
1937, Warner Bros., 111 min, USA, Dir: William A. Wellman

The first version of this twice-remade drama about the price of fame features Janet Gaynor as a Hollywood hopeful whose star rises while that of the alcoholic actor she loves (Fredric March) falls. An Oscar winner for best original story and an honorary Oscar winner for its beautiful Technicolor cinematography.


DESIGN FOR LIVING
1933, Universal, 91 min, USA, Dir: Ernst Lubitsch

Playwright Tom Chambers (Fredric March) and painter George Curtis (Gary Cooper) share an apartment in Paris and both fall for lovely interior designer Gilda Farrell (Miriam Hopkins). Gilda can't make up her mind which man she loves, so she concocts a scheme for the three of them to live together platonically. Of course it's not long before the two men are figuratively clawing at each other’s throats in this pre-Code delight from director Ernst Lubitsch and screenwriter Ben Hecht, based on Noel Coward’s play.


Syndicate content