THE HITCH-HIKER
1953, RKO, 71 min, USA, Dir: Ida Lupino

A groundbreaking, fact-based story of two pals on a Mexican fishing trip kidnapped by a serial killer who terrorizes both men into delivering him to safety. The only American film noir directed by a woman - the great Ida Lupino - features a trio of terrific performances by Frank Lovejoy, Edmond O’Brien and the odious William Talman.


HOUSE OF WAX
1953, Warner Bros., 88 min, USA, Dir: André De Toth

Vincent Price stars as a mad wax sculptor who diabolically dips his models/victims into hot wax, with help from Charles Bronson (here billed under his real name, Charles Buchinsky) in his first major role as the crazed artisan’s assistant. With Phyllis Kirk and Carolyn Jones.


TRY AND GET ME
1951, Film Noir Foundation, 91 min, USA, Dir: Cy Endfield

The true story of a shocking 1934 kidnapping and murder in San Jose provided the inspiration for one of the most compelling—and unjustly neglected—masterpieces of film noir. Ex-GI Howard Tyler (Frank Lovejoy), struggling to support his family, meets flashy hoodlum Jerry Slocum (Lloyd Bridges), who eases the gullible Howard into a lucrative life of crime. Their escapade turns dark and desperate when Jerry takes hostage the son of a wealthy local businessman. One of the last films made in the U.S. by blacklisted writer/director Cy Endfield before he relocated to England, TRY AND GET ME (originally released as THE SOUND OF FURY) has been restored by the Film Noir Foundation so that it may be experienced in its original form by future generations and assume its rightful status as one of the great films of its era. NOT ON DVD!


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