DOCTOR X
1932, Warner Bros., 76 min, USA, Dir: Michael Curtiz

A journalist (Lee Tracy) follows a trail of bodies left by the cannibalistic Moon Killer, eventually arriving at the medical academy run by Dr. Xavier (Lionel Atwill). With no shortage of suspects among his staff, Doctor X and the reporter race to identify the culprit before lovely Joan (Fay Wray) becomes his next victim. Curtiz and many of his cast and crew members soon would reteam for another two-color Technicolor thriller, MYSTERY OF THE WAX MUSEUM.


MYSTERY OF THE WAX MUSEUM
1933, Warner Bros., 77 min, USA, Dir: Michael Curtiz

Remade in 1953 as HOUSE OF WAX with Vincent Price, this horror thriller was one of the last films shot in two-color Technicolor. Lionel Atwill stars as Ivan Igor, a crippled sculptor who opens a wax museum in New York City peopled by figures that are disturbingly lifelike. As a woman who nearly winds up on display as Marie Antoinette, Fay Wray proves she doesn’t need a giant ape to scream convincingly.


KING KONG
1933, Warner Bros., 100 min, USA, Dir: Merian C. Cooper, Ernest B. Schoedsack

KING KONG remains the Eighth Wonder of the World, a marvelous, mysterious blend of awesome prehistoric monsters and newfangled technology (including airplanes, subway trains and the Empire State Building). Fay Wray lights up the screen as the beauty who drives the beast to distraction, with support from Robert Armstrong, Bruce Cabot and the astounding visual effects work of Willis O’Brien.


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