QUEEN OF EARTH
2015, IFC Films, 90 min, USA, Dir: Alex Ross Perry

Catherine (Elisabeth Moss) enters a dark period in her life after her father, a famous artist whose affairs she managed, dies and she is dumped by boyfriend James (Kentucker Audley). Catherine heads out to her best friend Virginia's (Katherine Waterston) lake house for some much-needed relaxation but is soon overcome with memories of time spent at the same house with James the year before. As Catherine reaches out to Virginia for support, Virginia begins spending increasing amounts of time with a local love interest, Rich (Patrick Fugit), and fissures in the relationship between the two women send Catherine into a downward spiral of delusion and madness. A bracing, eerie look at the deep bonds of friendship and the horrific effects of such bonds being frayed.


HER SMELL
2018, Gunpowder & Sky, 134 min, USA/Greece, Dir: Alex Ross Perry

Becky Something (Elisabeth Moss, in a towering, unflinching performance) is a '90s punk-rock superstar who once filled arenas with her grungy all-female trio Something She. Now she plays smaller venues while grappling with motherhood, exhausted bandmates, nervous record company executives and a new generation of rising talent eager to usurp her stardom. When Becky's chaos and excesses derail a recording session and national tour, she finds herself shunned, isolated and alone. Forced to get sober, temper her demons and reckon with the past, she retreats from the spotlight and tries to recapture the creative inspiration that led her band to success.


THE SQUARE (2017)
2017, Magnolia Pictures, 142 min, Sweden/Germany/France/Denmark, Dir: Ruben Östlund

In the latest from writer-director Ruben Östlund (FORCE MAJEURE), Claes Bang stars as Christian, the respected curator of a contemporary art museum, a divorced but devoted father of two who drives an electric car and supports good causes. His next show is “The Square,” an installation that invites passersby to altruism, reminding them of their role as responsible fellow human beings. But sometimes it is difficult to live up to your own ideals, and Christian’s foolish response to the theft of his phone drags him into shameful situations. Meanwhile, the museum's PR agency has created an unexpected campaign for ”The Square”; the response is overblown and sends Christian, as well as the museum, into an existential crisis. Costarring Elisabeth Moss and Dominic West, this droll satire won the Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival. “THE SQUARE is darkly amusing, but it’s also bracingly honest in its absurdity, and that’s what kept me coming back to each one of its wonderfully knotty scenarios even months after seeing it.” – David Sims, The Atlantic


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