THE SEA WOLF
1941, Warner Bros.,, 100 min, USA, Dir: Michael Curtiz

The definitive cinematic version of Jack London’s famed novel returns to the big screen. Edward G. Robinson’s magnificent portrayal of Wolf Larsen is the centerpiece of a darkly fatalistic tale adapted by Robert Rossen (ALL THE KING’S MEN, THE HUSTLER) who blends a distinctive anti-Nazi sentiment (initiated into American movies by the brothers Warner) with an unforgettable saga of tyranny at sea. An all-star cast of John Garfield, Ida Lupino, Gene Lockhart and Barry Fitzgerald add dramatic heft to Curtiz’s brilliantly helmed epic.


FLESH AND FANTASY
1943, Universal, 94 min, Dir: Julien Duvivier

Considered one of the greatest French directors (his PEPÉ LE MOKO is the virtual template for the “poetic realism” that informed film noir), Duvivier escaped the war years at home by bringing his incredible style to several offbeat Hollywood films of the early 1940s. This anthology of slightly supernatural tales - a proto-“Twilight Zone,” if you will - features a dazzling cast of stars (Edward G. Robinson, Barbara Stanwyck, Charles Boyer, Betty Field, Robert Cummings, Thomas Mitchell) and exceptional camerawork by Stanley Cortez and Paul Ivano.


ALL MY SONS
1948, Universal, 94 min, Dir: Irving Reis

Edward G. Robinson gives one of his most affecting performances as successful businessman Joe Keller, grappling with guilt over having framed his business partner for a crime he committed. When his son (Burt Lancaster) becomes engaged to the convicted man’s daughter, the sins of the past come hurtling back. Reis and writer-producer Chester Erskine - aided by the noir-stained cinematography of Russell Metty - create a powerful (and inexplicably rare) version of Arthur Miller’s Tony Award-winning play.


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