WALKER
1987, Universal, 94 min, Dir: Alex Cox

Born in Nashville in 1824, William Walker is one of American history’s forgotten rogues, a mercenary whose attempts to bring slavery to Central America briefly made him president of Nicaragua. Ed Harris stars in Alex Cox’s thought-provoking drama, whose deliberate anachronisms underline the fact that the more things change, the more they stay the same (the film was shot on location during the Contra War). With Peter Boyle, Marlee Matlin, René Auberjonois and a score by frequent Cox collaborator Joe Strummer of The Clash. “Without being solemn, it's deadly serious. ... WALKER is something very rare in American movies these days. It has some nerve." - Vincent Canby, The New York Times.


THE RIGHT STUFF
1983, Warner Bros., 193 min, USA, Dir: Philip Kaufman

Sam Shepard, Scott Glenn, Ed Harris, Barbara Hershey, Dennis Quaid, Fred Ward and Jeff Goldblum head the stellar ensemble cast of THE RIGHT STUFF, which is based on Tom Wolfe’s best-selling book chronicling the exciting early years of the United States’ race to conquer the final frontier, and the daredevil test pilots who ultimately became the first Americans in space. Kaufman also wrote the screenplay for the film, which Pauline Kael of The New Yorker called “astonishingly entertaining and great fun.”


MOTHER!
2017, Paramount, 121 min, USA, Dir: Darren Aronofsky

A young wife (Jennifer Lawrence) learns a lot of hard truths about her passionate but enigmatic husband (Javier Bardem) when their house is set upon by visitors who may or may not have malicious intentions. Writer-director Darren Aronofsky crafts an ambitious, divisive - and absolutely masterful - exercise in psychological suspense rich in allegory, metaphor and visceral horror that ranks with the best of Roman Polanski and Tobe Hooper. Jennifer Lawrence is fearless and powerful as the heroine through whose eyes we experience all the terror, poignancy, and exhilaration of Aronofsky’s fiercely original vision. Costarring Ed Harris and Michelle Pfeiffer.


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