FRANKENSTEIN MEETS THE WOLF MAN
1943, Universal, 74 min, France/USA, Dir: Roy William Neill

Cursed to turn into murderous beast with every full moon, Larry Talbot (Lon Chaney Jr.) heads for Frankenstein’s castle, hoping its secrets can bring an end to his misery. Instead, he finds the scientist’s titular creation (Bela Lugosi) encased in ice. Penned by writer Curt Siodmak, this first meeting of the Universal movie monsters includes appearances by horror stalwarts Lionel Atwill, Dwight Frye and Maria Ouspenskaya.


FRANKENSTEIN
1931, Universal, 70 min, USA, Dir: James Whale

"A Monster Science Created – But Could Not Destroy!" Boris Karloff had appeared in more than 75 films before FRANKENSTEIN turned him almost overnight into a screen legend. His performance here - anguished, eloquent, wordless - remains one of the most hauntingly powerful in all cinema. With Colin Clive, Edward Van Sloan, Dwight Frye.


DRACULA (1931)
1931, Universal, 75 min, USA, Dir: Tod Browning

Director Tod Browning (FREAKS) and actor Bela Lugosi established the Transylvanian count as one of the archetypal movie vampires and a monster icon for Universal Studios’ golden era of classic horror films. This adaptation of Hamilton Deane’s then-popular stage play of Bram Stoker’s novel is quite different from Murnau’s silent NOSFERATU, and from later works coming from Hammer Studios from the 1950s through 1970s and Francis Ford Coppola in 1990. Real estate agent Renfield (played by everyone’s favorite madman, Dwight Frye) goes insane after visiting Dracula (Bela Lugosi) at his Transylvania castle and is thereafter confined to a London asylum, though he does the count’s bidding as a hypnotized slave when Dracula comes to Britain and moves into deserted Carfax Abbey. David Manners is Jonathan Harker and Helen Chandler is his lady love, whom Dracula wants to make his bride. Edward Van Sloan, a fixture in early Universal horrors, is Professor Van Helsing.


Syndicate content