CHICAGO DEADLINE
1949, Universal, 86 min, USA, Dir: Lewis Allen

Alan Ladd is a newspaper reporter obsessed with a young woman he finds dead in a cheap brothel. Connecting the dots all around Chicago, he cobbles together the sad history of a good girl (Donna Reed) gone wrong. Incredibly rare, not screened for decades before being resurrected by the Film Noir Foundation, the film makes excellent use of various Chicago locales (shot by the great John F. Seitz) to tell a tawdry, ink-stained variation of LAURA. Featuring a terrific supporting cast, including June Havoc, Irene Hervey, Arthur Kennedy and Berry Kroeger.


THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY
1945, Warner Brothers, 110 min, Dir: Albert Lewin

In the definitive screen adaptation of Oscar Wilde’s sole novel, Dorian Gray (Hurd Hatfield) falls under the corrupting influence of Lord Henry Wotton (George Sanders) and makes a Faustian bargain: Gray’s portrait will age instead of him. Angela Lansbury is a standout as the woman whose heart is broken by the titular narcissist. This macabre fantasy was an Oscar winner for Harry Stradling Sr.’s cinematography (which features shocking flashes of color).


FROM HERE TO ETERNITY
1953, Sony Repertory, 118 min, Dir: Fred Zinnemann

This 1953 Oscar winner (for Best Picture, Director, Cinematography and others) remains a timeless combination of war movie and love story that's as smart and adult as it is entertaining. James Jones' novel about military life at a Hawaiian army barracks on the brink of America’s entering World War II is the source for a riveting drama starring Burt Lancaster, Deborah Kerr, Donna Reed, Frank Sinatra, Montgomery Clift and many others.


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