EYE OF THE DEVIL
1966, Warner Bros., 92 min, UK, Dir: J. Lee Thompson

When French nobleman David Niven is summoned to his vineyard after an unproductive season, he tells wife Deborah Kerr to stay behind. She doesn’t listen, and soon discovers the rural estate is run by ancient pagan practices that exact a terrible toll. With the ever-creepy Donald Pleasance and, as sibling witches, David Hemmings and Sharon Tate (in her first major film role).


DEEP RED
PROFONDO ROSSO
1975, 106 min, Italy, Dir: Dario Argento

From the opening with a child slashing someone and a bloody knife dropping to the floor, we're plunged into an ever-deepening pool of repressed terrors. David Hemmings is a pianist sucked into an undertow of escalating homicide after he witnesses the murder of psychic Macha Meril. One of Argento's most justly famous gialli, where something as simple as a lizard writhing on the floor could represent a child's wounded psyche, bound someday to erupt in spectacular fits of murder. The dark and distinctive, keyboard-rich soundtrack - the first by prog rockers Goblin - was a major hit in Italy. With Daria Nicolodi.


BARBARELLA
1968, Paramount, 98 min, France/Italy, Dir: Roger Vadim

Jane Fonda, the final word in comic-strip space heroines, trips the light fantastic in director Roger Vadim's delightfully whacked-out romp in the 41st century, an acid-trip lightshow of a universe populated by blind birdman John Phillip Law, one-eyed dominatrix Anita Pallenberg (Keith Richards’ onetime girlfriend!) and galaxy dictator Durand-Durand (Milo O'Shea) and his orgasm machine. Ultra-groovy soft-psych soundtrack by Bob Crewe and The Glitterhouse. With David Hemmings and Marcel Marceau.


Syndicate content