ONE WAY STREET
1950, Universal, 79 min, USA, Dir: Hugo Fregonese

Even though he had just begun his American film career, James Mason already had his doomed-fugitive persona down pat in ODD MAN OUT and THE RECKLESS MOMENT. Here he’s a disillusioned doctor who feels responsible for his wife’s death and believes he’s only worthy of patching up wounded criminals. Deciding to take a gamble, he tricks Los Angeles gang boss Dan Duryea out of his latest haul, as well as absconding with Duryea’s more than willing moll, Marta Toren. The pair head for Mexico with the swag – but can they outrun Duryea’s seemingly limitless reach?


LARCENY
1948, Universal, 89 min, USA, Dir: George Sherman

Here’s one of Dan Duryea’s most obscure titles, also notable for being the first foray into film noir for crooner John Payne (of 99 RIVER STREET and KANSAS CITY CONFIDENTIAL fame). The two slicks play hustlers trying to bilk a war widow (Joan Caulfield) out of her money. Things really heat up when pistol-packing Shelley Winters, who has a thing for both men, hits town. Wisecracking scriptwriter Bill Bowers has a field day with all the slang-spewing sass.


TOO LATE FOR TEARS
1949, 99 min, USA, Dir: Byron Haskin

A ruthless housewife is determined to keep an ill-gotten satchel of cash, even if it means murder. One of the great noirs of the classic era, long thought lost but now returned to the big screen! "You know, Tiger, I didn't know they made 'em as beautiful as you are, and as smart, or as hard. Here, you can have the gun." Starring Lizabeth Scott, Dan Duryea, Arthur Kennedy.
BLAKE: Looking for something?

JANE: My lipstick.

BLAKE: Colt? Or a Smith and Wesson?


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