MAD LOVE
1935, Warner Bros., 68 min, USA, Dir: Karl Freund

“Dead hands that live ... and love ... and kill!” It's macabre shenanigans involving amputated hands as Grand Guignol theater star Yvonne Orlac (Frances Drake) goes to brilliant - but crazy - surgeon Dr. Gogol (Peter Lorre) as a last resort when her concert pianist husband, Stephen (Colin Clive, of FRANKENSTEIN), has his hands mangled in a train accident. Gogol, insanely in love with Yvonne and willing to do anything to steal her away, transplants the hands of a guillotined murderer onto the comatose Stephen. Counting on the highly suggestive nature of the neurotic pianist, Gogol makes him believe he also possesses the dead killer’s personality. An intense, delirious adaptation of French writer Maurice Renard’s oft-filmed novel The Hands of Orlac.


BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN
1935, Universal, 75 min, USA, Dir: James Whale

"Warning! The Monster Demands a Mate!" Widely considered the high point of the 1930s Universal horror cycle, BRIDE is a brilliant blend of black humor and Gothic style. Boris Karloff reprises his greatest role as the Monster, with Colin Clive as his reluctant "father," the hilariously creepy Ernest Thesiger as Dr. Pretorius and Elsa Lanchester as the screaming-mimi Bride.


FRANKENSTEIN
1931, Universal, 70 min, USA, Dir: James Whale

"A Monster Science Created – But Could Not Destroy!" Boris Karloff had appeared in more than 75 films before FRANKENSTEIN turned him almost overnight into a screen legend. His performance here - anguished, eloquent, wordless - remains one of the most hauntingly powerful in all cinema. With Colin Clive, Edward Van Sloan, Dwight Frye.


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