THE NIGHT OF THE GENERALS
1967, Sony Repertory, 148 min, UK/France, Dir: Anatole Litvak

LAWRENCE OF ARABIA costars Peter O’Toole and Omar Sharif (and composer Maurice Jarre) reunite for this underrated mix of WWII history and murder mystery. When a prostitute who had been working as a German agent in occupied Warsaw is killed, military intelligence investigator Major Grau (Sharif) focuses on three German officers (Donald Pleasence, Charles Gray and O’Toole) as suspects while wartime intrigue swirls about. With Tom Courtenay, Philippe Noiret and Christopher Plummer.


THE MAN WHO WOULD BE KING
1975, Warner Bros., 129 min, USA, Dir: John Huston

Michael Caine and Sean Connery are two British soldier-pals trying to bamboozle high priests of remote Kafiristan into turning over their riches by convincing them that Connery is a god. With Christopher Plummer as Rudyard Kipling (whose short story inspired the film).


THE NEW WORLD
2005, Warner Bros., 135 min, USA, Dir: Terrence Malick

Dreamy, effervescent and endlessly poetic, Terrence Malick’s reimagining of the 1607 founding of Jamestown and the legendary love triangle between Captain John Smith (Colin Farrell), Pocahontas (Q’orianka Kilcher) and John Rolfe (Christian Bale) has recently been described by critics as a “misunderstood masterpiece.” Malick superbly crafts and endows his tale with a raw, haunting sense of realism: he famously chose to use natural lighting, handheld cameras and a painstakingly detailed set constructed just down-river from the original site of Jamestown. Historically and cinematically important, THE NEW WORLD is a refreshingly complex alternative to the simplified national foundational myths that currently populate American culture.


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