THE OMEGA MAN
1971, Warner Bros., 98 min, USA, Dir: Boris Sagal

Whiskey-drinking, WOODSTOCK-watching scientist Charlton Heston faces the possible extinction of mankind, while bug-eyed Anthony Zerbe and his legions of soul-brother vampires prowl the night, in this whacked-out adaptation of Richard Matheson’s classic novel I Am Legend. Here, Heston remade himself as an über-cool 1970s action star, who cruises the plague-ridden streets of L.A. in a convertible Mustang.


THE TEN COMMANDMENTS
1956, Paramount, 220 min, USA, Dir: Cecil B. De Mille

"Let his name be stricken from every pillar and obelisk!" orders imperious pharaoh Yul Brynner, as favored son-turned-religious rebel Charlton Heston prepares to lead his people out of bondage in Egypt. Cecil B. De Mille’s glorious remake of his earlier 1923 TEN COMMANDMENTS emphasized the colossal spectacle of the biblical epic, but never downplayed the tremendous human emotions at the core of the story. (Look for Heston’s then-3-month-old son Fraser as the baby Moses in the bulrushes!) With Anne Baxter, Edward G. Robinson, Yvonne De Carlo, Debra Paget, John Derek, Nina Foch and Vincent Price, and featuring striking VistaVision cinematography by Loyal Griggs (SHANE).


EARTHQUAKE
1974, Universal, 123 min, USA, Dir: Mark Robson

Director Mark Robson (VALLEY OF THE DOLLS) spins a spectacularly entertaining guilty-pleasure yarn of Los Angeles denizens trapped by a high-magnitude earthquake, with Charlton Heston as a construction engineer trying to deal with his boozy, jealous wife, Ava Gardner, whose father (Lorne Greene of TV’s "Bonanza") just happens to be his boss, while walking a tightrope with his mistress, widow Geneviève Bujold. Then the earthquake hits! With Barry Sullivan, Lloyd Nolan and, in a surprising cameo, Walter Matthau.


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