ST. MARTIN’S LANE
1938, Cohen Film, 83 min, UK, Dir: Tim Whelan

Street entertainer Charles Staggers (Charles Laughton) has eyes for beautiful pickpocket Libby (Vivien Leigh) and convinces her to work the crowd as a busker instead of a thief. But Charles realizes that the posh Harley Prentiss (Rex Harrison) can do a lot more for Libby than he can. Featuring three outstanding performances, this clever comedy was released in the U.S. as SIDEWALKS OF LONDON – after GONE WITH THE WIND had made Leigh a star.


ISLAND OF LOST SOULS
1932, Universal, 70 min, USA, Dir: Erle C. Kenton

Director Erle C. Kenton adapted H.G. Wells’ The Island of Dr. Moreau into one of the classic Pre-Code horror shockers. Originally released by Paramount to compete with Universal’s monster menagerie, ironically Universal now owns the rights. Seaman Richard Arlen is marooned on vivisectionist Charles Laughton’s private isle, where he has developed a race of subhumans from various wild animals in his "House of Pain." An old-school chiller that remains scary to this day. Bela Lugosi is the ringleader of the beast-men. With Kathleen Burke as Lota, the Panther Woman. "…a remarkably powerful film." – Time Out (London)


THE BRIBE
1949, MGM [Warner Bros.], 98 min, USA, Dir: Robert Z. Leonard

Less a coherent drama than a sweaty fever-dream of ’40s film noir, THE BRIBE features an all-star cast (Robert Taylor, Ava Gardner, Charles Laughton, Vincent Price, John Hodiak) trapped on the steamy Caribbean isle of “Carlota” (as only MGM’s art department could render it), perspiring through a convoluted tale of romance, disease and WWII contraband. Skip the logic and wallow in the exotic artifice of this sublime noir fantasia, directed by Robert Z. Leonard, photographed by the great Joe Ruttenberg and scored by the magnificent Miklos Rozsa!


Syndicate content