THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN
1960, Park Circus/MGM, 128 min, USA, Dir: John Sturges

Excellent, Americanized version of the Akira Kurosawa classic THE SEVEN SAMURAI, helmed by noted action auteur John Sturges (THE GREAT ESCAPE, BAD DAY AT BLACK ROCK), with charismatic Steve McQueen making his first star turn alongside Yul Brynner, Charles Bronson, James Coburn, Robert Vaughn, Brad Dexter and Horst Buchholz as gunmen hired to safeguard a Mexican farm village from marauding bandit chieftain Eli Wallach. With an instantly memorable Elmer Bernstein score, which inspired everything from future Westerns to cigarette commercials (!) for decades to come.


HOUSE OF WAX
1953, Warner Bros., 88 min, USA, Dir: André De Toth

Vincent Price stars as a mad wax sculptor who diabolically dips his models/victims into hot wax, with help from Charles Bronson (here billed under his real name, Charles Buchinsky) in his first major role as the crazed artisan’s assistant. With Phyllis Kirk and Carolyn Jones.


THE DIRTY DOZEN
1967, Warner Bros., 149 min, USA, Dir: Robert Aldrich

Lee Marvin whips a group of unruly criminals (including John Cassavetes and Charles Bronson) into shape for a WWII suicide mission, and the result is an action epic that deals with issues of race, class and war in a massively entertaining context. Ernest Borgnine is an ornery general making Marvin’s life hell.


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