CRISS CROSS
1949, Universal, 87 min, USA, Dir: Robert Siodmak

When he died in 1947, producer Mark Hellinger had just begun pre-production on this crime-infected love story. Thanks to the inspired vision of director Siodmak, CRISS CROSS now stands as perhaps the most darkly poetic rendering of amour fou in all film noir. Burt Lancaster and Dan Duryea plot a daring heist, while vying for the affections of sensual Yvonne DeCarlo. Remade by Stephen Soderbergh as THE UNDERNEATH.


ALL MY SONS
1948, Universal, 94 min, Dir: Irving Reis

Edward G. Robinson gives one of his most affecting performances as successful businessman Joe Keller, grappling with guilt over having framed his business partner for a crime he committed. When his son (Burt Lancaster) becomes engaged to the convicted man’s daughter, the sins of the past come hurtling back. Reis and writer-producer Chester Erskine - aided by the noir-stained cinematography of Russell Metty - create a powerful (and inexplicably rare) version of Arthur Miller’s Tony Award-winning play.


AIRPORT
1970, Universal, 137 min, USA, Dir: George Seaton

The success of this film launched a wave of 1970s disaster movies. Featuring an all-star cast including Burt Lancaster, Dean Martin, Jean Seberg. Jacqueline Bissett, Helen Hayes (who won the Supporting Actress Oscar for her performance) and more, the story revolves around a Chicago airport manager trying to keep things running during a snowstorm, as a suicidal bomber plots to blow up a Boeing 707.


Syndicate content