MOONRISE KINGDOM
2012, Focus Features, 94 min, USA, Dir: Wes Anderson

Set on an island off the coast of New England in the summer of 1965, MOONRISE KINGDOM tells the story of two 12-year-olds who fall in love, make a secret pact and run away together into the wilderness. As various authorities hunt for them, a violent storm is brewing offshore - and the peaceful island community is turned upside down in more ways than anyone can handle. Bruce Willis plays the local sheriff, Edward Norton is a Khaki Scout troop leader and Bill Murray and Frances McDormand portray the young girl's parents. The cast also includes Tilda Swinton and Jason Schwartzman, with Jared Gilman and Kara Hayward as the boy and girl.


PULP FICTION
1994, Park Circus/Miramax, 153 min, USA, Dir: Quentin Tarantino

Quentin Tarantino’s dazzling, nitro-fueled homage to 1930s crime fiction, Elvis Presley flicks, Los Angeles diners, Jean-Luc Godard, Jean-Pierre Melville and much more was easily the most audacious and exciting American film of the 1990s. The movie’s brilliant, against-type casting includes John Travolta (in a career-reviving performance), Samuel L. Jackson, Uma Thurman, Bruce Willis, Harvey Keitel, Eric Stolz, Maria de Medeiros, Tim Roth, Amanda Plummer, Christopher Walken and Ving Rhames. Nominated for seven Oscars and winner for Best Screenplay. Winner of LAFCA Awards for Best Picture, Actor (Travolta) and Screenplay (Tarantino and Roger Avary).


SIN CITY
2005, Dimension Films, 124 min, USA, Dir: Robert Rodriguez, Frank Miller

Director Robert Rodriguez - with a little help from Quentin Tarantino - turned graphic novelist/co-director Frank Miller’s neo-noir tales of dark doings in Basin City into one of the most visually striking films of recent years. An anthology of several short stories (“The Hard Goodbye,” “The Big Fat Kill,” “That Yellow Bastard” and “The Customer Is Always Right”), SIN CITY features an all-star ensemble cast including Bruce Willis, Jessica Alba, Josh Hartnett, Mickey Rourke, Clive Owen and Benicio Del Toro. The violent crime thriller was one of the first films shot on a digital backlot, with most of the sets (and color accents to the high-contrast B&W cinematography) added in post-production to create a look of glittering grime.


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