GAS FOOD LODGING
1992, IRS Media, 101 min, Dir: Allison Anders

The acclaimed second feature from writer-director Allison Anders stars Brooke Adams as a single mom struggling to raise two teenage girls (Ione Skye and Independent Spirit winner Fairuza Balk) in a small town in New Mexico. Featuring music (and a cameo appearance) by J. Mascis of Dinosaur Jr., this heartfelt drama is among the most affecting indies of the 1990s.


INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS (1978)
1978, Park Circus/MGM, 115 min, USA, Dir: Philip Kaufman

A deftly handled, scary reimagining of both Jack Finney’s source novel and Don Siegel’s original 1956 movie, with Donald Sutherland, Brooke Adams and Leonard Nimoy trying to deal with the sudden influx of body-snatching alien seed pods in the San Francisco Bay Area. With Jeff Goldblum, Veronica Cartwright, Lelia Goldoni and Don Siegel as a cab driver. Cinematography by Michael Chapman (RAGING BULL, TAXI DRIVER).


DAYS OF HEAVEN
1978, Paramount, 95 min, Dir: Terrence Malick

Director Terrence Malick’s lyrical tone poem set at the turn of the 20th century tracks impoverished Chicago couple Richard Gere and Brooke Adams as they migrate to the Texas Panhandle and masquerade as brother and sister to find farm work. When their smitten, terminally ill boss (Sam Shepard) proposes to Adams, the couple see a way out of their poverty. But after the marriage, Shepard seemingly recovers, and tragic complications gradually unfold. Gorgeous, thoughtful and at times achingly romantic, this ambitious working-class epic set the standard for Malick’s future films - passionate, moody and serene meditations on the human condition set in a tragic dimension. Nestor Almendros won the Oscar for Best Cinematography. Co-starring Linda Manz.


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