THE NAKED CITY
1948, Janus Films, 96 min, USA, Dir: Jules Dassin

A landmark crime movie, producer Mark Hellinger's hardboiled tribute to his beloved Big Apple peels away all the stylistic melodramatics of noir to present Hollywood's first true policier. The scrupulously researched script by Malvin Wald and vivid location photography by William Daniels (an Oscar winner) combined to make this one of the most influential Hollywood films of the 1940s. With Barry Fitzgerald, Howard Duff, Don Taylor, Dorothy Hart and a very scary Ted de Corsia.


GOING MY WAY
1944, Universal, 126 min, USA, Dir: Leo McCarey

In his most famous movie role, Bing Crosby plays Father Chuck O’Malley, a young priest sent to take over a troubled New York City parish from the aging Father Fitzgibbon (Barry Fitzgerald), who doesn’t know he’s being replaced. Undeniably sentimental yet undeniably moving, this feel-good comedy-drama earned seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Director, Actor (Crosby), Supporting Actor (Fitzgerald) and Song (“Swinging on a Star”).


BRINGING UP BABY
1938, Warner Bros., 102 min, USA, Dir: Howard Hawks

Perhaps the greatest and most influential screwball comedy of all time, with Katharine Hepburn letting her hair down as a madcap heiress and Cary Grant putting his up as the absent-minded zoologist she’s decided she’s in love with. It just doesn’t get any funnier - or more frantic - than this. With Charlie Ruggles, Barry Fitzgerald, May Robson, Walter Catlett, Fritz Feld and screwball mascot Asta as George the dog.


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