THE CURSE OF THE WEREWOLF
1961, Universal, 93 min, UK, Dir: Terence Fisher

Director Terence Fisher’s atmospheric thriller not only has the distinction of being not only Oliver Reed’s first leading role but also Hammer Studios’ only werewolf film. And a chillingly fine werewolf film it is, with cursed Reed the offspring born on Christmas Day to a mute servant girl (Yvonne Romain) raped by a bestial beggar (Richard Wordsworth) in the dungeons of the sadistic Marques Siniestro (deliciously depraved Anthony Dawson). Kindly Don Alfredo (Clifford Evans) raises Reed in a good home, but when the sensitive young man reaches puberty and his desires are thwarted, the result is a frenzy of bloody carnage.


DIAL M FOR MURDER
1954, Warner Bros., 105 min, Dir: Alfred Hitchcock

Suave, cold-blooded Ray Milland plots to murder his beautiful wife (Grace Kelly) and leaves the key to their apartment outside for his hired killer (Anthony Dawson). When the killer has a bit of trouble - to put it mildly - with a pair of scissors, a new Pandora’s box of complications opens up. Unfortunately, scheming Milland may still be able to pull off his plan - that is, unless Kelly’s old flame, Robert Cummings and unflappable Scotland Yard inspector John Williams can determine what really happened that fateful night. Maestro Hitchcock masterfully adapts Frederick Knott’s hit stage play to the big screen (it was originally presented in 3-D).


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