LOLA (1961)
1961, Janus Films, 90 min, France, Dir: Jacques Demy

Jacques Demy’s feature debut was described by its director as a “musical without music,” though “a love story without love” may be just as appropriate. Roland (Marc Michel, who would later play the same role in Demy’s THE UMBRELLAS OF CHERBOURG) is smitten with his former girlfriend, Dietrich-esque cabaret dancer Lola (Anouk Aimée), but she pines for the lover who abandoned her years earlier. French New Wave mainstays Raoul Coutard and Michel Legrand provide the cinematography and score, respectively. In French and English with English subtitles.


MODEL SHOP
1969, Sony Repertory, 95 min, USA/France, Dir: Jacques Demy

Gary Lockwood stars as a young American who falls in love with French model Anouk Aimée, in Jacques Demy's only Hollywood studio feature (it was financed by Columbia). Aimée reprises her role as the titular character of Demy's first film, LOLA, but neither she nor Lockwood is the real star of MODEL SHOP: That honor goes to the city of Los Angeles itself, which Demy photographs with the same blend of wonder and authenticity that characterizes his French films. This is no idealized version of Hollywood - it's an L.A. of supermarkets and parking lots - yet Demy's romantic eye lends a style and dignity to even the most mundane people and locations. In English.


LA DOLCE VITA
1960, Paramount, 185 min, Italy, Dir: Federico Fellini

Director Federico Fellini feels his way from the neo-realist past to the illusory future in this incredible emotional travelogue of the soul of modern Rome. How better to open the free-wheeling 1960s than with this alternately funny, feral, sweet and seductive meditation on what is truly meaningful (if anything) for the dusk-to-dawn Italian jet set? Marcello Mastroianni was catapulted into superstar status as the sensitive tabloid reporter juggling the affections of several women (voluptuous movie star Anita Ekberg, icy mistress Anouk Aimee and neurotic girlfriend Magali Noel) while making the rounds of the spirit-destroying nightlife of the Via Veneto. Mastroianni’s scene with Ekberg in the Trevi Fountain at dawn remains one of the most timeless, memorable images ever to emerge from world cinema. "I feel that decadence is indispensable to rebirth." - Fellini. In Italian with English subtitles.


Syndicate content