THE KILLING FLOOR
1984, Film Movement, 118 min, USA, Dir: Bill Duke

Bill Duke's feature debut, which premiered on PBS' American Playhouse series in 1984 to rave reviews, tells the little-known true story of the struggle to build an interracial labor union in the Chicago stockyards. The screenplay by Obie Award-winner Leslie Lee, based on an original story by producer Elsa Rassbach, traces the racial and class conflicts seething in the city’s giant slaughterhouses, and the brutal efforts of management to divide the workforce along ethnic lines, which eventually boiled over in the Chicago race riot of 1919. Damien Leake, Alfre Woodard, Dennis Farina and Moses Gunn star in the film, which won the Sundance Film Festival Special Jury Award. "THE KILLING FLOOR is part of our nation's history - a fascinating and bloody episode in the history of the U.S. labor movement ... a powerful, personal drama." - Marilyn Preston, Chicago Tribune


JUANITA
2019, Netflix, 90 min, USA, Dir: Clark Johnson

Burdened by troubles in life and love, a mother of three grown children searches for hope and healing on an impromptu trip to Paper Moon, Montana. With Alfre Woodard.


CROOKLYN
1994, Universal, 114 min, USA, Dir: Spike Lee

Starring Alfre Woodard and Delroy Lindo and featuring a standout performance from Zelda Harris as the film’s 9-year-old narrator, CROOKLYN is a beautifully textured look at growing up right and wrong in black America. The emotional flip side to the more explosive DO THE RIGHT THING, the film (co-written with sister Joie and brother Cinque) is Lee’s most heartfelt (and surprisingly sentimental) film: a semiautobiographical portrait of the Carmichael family in Brooklyn in the early 1970s.


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