SORCERER
1977, Paramount, 122 min, Dir: William Friedkin

Friedkin’s most visually awesome film follows small-time crook Roy Scheider from Brooklyn to the sweltering South American jungles, where he lands a job hauling nitroglycerine with hard-luck losers Bruno Cremer and Francisco Rabal. Rather than simply remake Henri-Georges Clouzot’s famed WAGES OF FEAR, Friedkin re-imagined the story as a cosmic vision of man vs. nature, climaxing in the mind-bending image of Scheider and crew literally pushing a loaded truck across a spindly rope bridge.


THE FRENCH CONNECTION
1971, 20th Century Fox, 104 min, Dir: William Friedkin

Arguably the greatest American crime film ever made. Gene Hackman stars as Detective Popeye Doyle, who’s muscling minor hoods in NYC (the "You ever pick your feet in Poughkeepsie?" scene is still a classic) when he catches the trail of a huge shipment of French heroin. With partner Roy Scheider, Hackman dogs drug-kingpin Fernando Rey through the concrete jungle - highlighted by a brain-jangling car chase that still hasn’t been topped.


JAWS
1975, Universal, 124 min, Dir: Steven Spielberg

Roy Scheider is a sheriff confronting crowds of sunbathers, self-serving local politicians and - most important - a monstrous great white shark over the Fourth of July weekend in Martha’s Vineyard. With Robert Shaw, Richard Dreyfuss.


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