FLESH AND FANTASY
1943, Universal, 94 min, Dir: Julien Duvivier

Considered one of the greatest French directors (his PEPÉ LE MOKO is the virtual template for the “poetic realism” that informed film noir), Duvivier escaped the war years at home by bringing his incredible style to several offbeat Hollywood films of the early 1940s. This anthology of slightly supernatural tales - a proto-“Twilight Zone,” if you will - features a dazzling cast of stars (Edward G. Robinson, Barbara Stanwyck, Charles Boyer, Betty Field, Robert Cummings, Thomas Mitchell) and exceptional camerawork by Stanley Cortez and Paul Ivano.


DEAD MEN DON'T WEAR PLAID
1982, Universal, 88 min, USA, Dir: Carl Reiner

Steve Martin is a private eye who interacts with some of film noir’s iconic characters thanks to gorgeous black-and-white cinematography and some extremely creative editing. Humphrey Bogart, Barbara Stanwyck, Alan Ladd and Ingrid Bergman (whose scenes were repurposed from NOTORIOUS) are just some of the famous faces you’ll spot!


JEOPARDY
1953, Warner Bros., 69 min, USA, Dir: John Sturges

Barbara Stanwyck and Barry Sullivan play a vacationing couple whose fishing trip to Baja turns into a nightmare when the husband is trapped under a rotting pier with the tide rising. Their only hope is a fugitive killer (Ralph Meeker), whose aid comes at a high cost for the terrified, if resourceful, wife. A suspense gem directed and played with all the stops out, especially when Stanwyck and Meeker go toe-to-toe!


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